Thank You!

A big thanks to our sponsors, participants, supporters, and volunteers for making the 19th Annual Mary’s Walk and Kerrymen 5k a success!  Despite having to move the event from March 19th to March 26th, we had over 2,600 participants and will raise in excess of $280,000 in the fight against cancer. All proceeds are donated to the Maine Cancer Foundation supporting statewide cancer programs and translational research.

Mary’s Walk enjoyed incredible fundraising team participation led by Team UNUM, who raised $15,000.  Teri Brown of Team UNUM individually raised over $11,076.  Incredible!  Doug Bennet and the Red Storm Strikes Out Cancer was again the leading fundraiser in the school community group raising $10,501.  In the Friends and Family category, the KJ Cancer Crew, led by individual fundraiser Ken Jansen and captained by wife Laurie Jansen, raised $8,475.  This year’s event was dedicated to Ken Jansen, a long-time volunteer on the Mary’s Walk Planning Committee, who is fighting his own personal battle with esophageal cancer.  Ken spoke during the opening ceremonies, inspiring everyone with his message of how important a positive attitude is to healing the cells that cancer scars.

I want to again personally thank Mark Stevens and Mike Hirschy of CRI-SIL Silicone Technologies for being our presenting sponsor ($20,000).  Mark, Mike, and the CRI-SIL team have given the Mary’s Walk sponsorship campaign renewed vigor in the fight against cancer.

I also want to thank all of our sponsors you see posted on our web page.  These businesses are an important part of Mary’s Walk and help lead our community in the fight against cancer.  Please check out our sponsors and let them know on their websites how important you believe their contribution to the community is in the battle against cancer.

I wish to thank Thornton Academy for the use of their facility and their continued support of Mary’s Walk.  I also want to recognize two teachers at the Academy:  David Arenstam, the director of the Kerrymen 5k and our Facebook/Media genius, and his wife, Teri Arenstam, our director of volunteers, for their contributions to the event.  This year we had over 150 TA students volunteering for Mary’s Walk and supporting their community. 

We had a new member of the Planning Committee this year, Don Roth, who is the new director of the food court specializing in free food and drink after the event.  Don undertook an overwhelming responsibility and did an excellent job in his inaugural year.  Thanks Don!

Next year, Mary’s Walk and the Kerrymen 5k celebrate our 20th anniversary on March 18, 2018.  We hope to see you there.

Slancha!

Gene Libby

Photo Galleries

Posted on:
09/21/2017

For this month's Challenge Cancer 2020 package, our partners at WMTW-TV interview Maine Cancer Foundation grantee, Dr. Paul Han with Maine Medical Center, and Terry Kunjel with Maine Coalition to Fight Prostate Cancer.  

For the month of September Maine Cancer Foundation is focusing on men's health and prostate cancer.  Shared decision making is critical to patient centered health care and can lead to a healthier Maine.  

#togetherwecan #challengecancer2020

 

Posted on:
09/12/2017

In our Snapshots blog series, we turn to Maine Cancer Foundation constituents - from staff, board members and other volunteers, donors, grant recipients and beyond - to share important moments in their lives related to cancer. Our series will paint a broad stroke of the cancer landscape in the state, while narrowing the focus into the rare and intimate moments that bring us all together.

Snapshots #6 is the story of Jon Henry, who was diagnosed with prostate cancer at just 44 years old. His treatment caused life-altering side effects, but even in the midst of challenges, Jon found camaraderie and healing. 

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Posted on:
09/07/2017

While cancer can seem scary, there are things we can do to lower our risk. This month, Maine Cancer Foundation is discussing men's health. Enjoy this helpful infographic from our colleagues at the American Institute for Cancer Research:

Posted on:
09/06/2017

Paul Han, MD, MA, MPH, is the Director of the Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation at Maine Medical Center Research Institute. In June 2016, Maine Cancer Foundation awarded Maine Medical Center a $400,000 grant over four years for The Maine Lung Cancer Prevention and Screening (Maine LungCAPS) InitiativeMaine LungCAPS is a multi-institution, multi-disciplinary collaboration of Maine health care providers and stakeholders. Dr. Han serves as Principal Investigator for the initiative, designed to improve the prevention, early detection and treatment of lung cancer in Maine

The month of September is dedicated to men’s health and prostate cancer. In our guest blog series, Dr. Han shares his opinions about the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, a blood test used to screen for prostate cancer.

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Prostate cancer is the most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer deaths among US men.  The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test is a blood test used to “screen” for prostate cancer—that is, to detect cancer at an early stage, when it can be effectively treated.  PSA testing is currently the only available screening test for prostate cancer, and for many years it has been widely used. 

PSA screening has also been controversial.  It’s not a perfect test because it misses some cancers (leading to false reassurance), and can also produce false-positive results (“false alarms”), which can lead to unnecessary anxiety and prostate biopsy procedures.  And although prostate cancer can be aggressive and lethal, many of the cancers detected by the PSA test will never grow, spread, or cause additional problems. 

Posted on:
08/29/2017

Maine is the most rural state in the nation, which bodes well for scenic landscapes, but proves difficult for residents traveling long distances for cancer care. Connie Garber, former Transportation Director for York County Community Action Corporation (YCCAC), frames the issue to explain the necessity for transportation assistance. “Recall a time when your car was unavailable to you for a day,” she said. “What does this do to your normal course of action over the day? How disrupted was your personal mobility?” This day-in-the-life scenario is easy to conjure for even the most affluent Mainer, and the upset to routine is undeniable.

For thousands of Mainers, lack of transportation is an overwhelming burden. Individual travel needs can be as varied as cancer itself; one person might require short-term assistance to and from radiation treatment (typically lasting just six weeks) because friends or family are unavailable. Another patient might have a disability which requires a specialized vehicle. “There’s no one approach to transportation,” said Garber. “We take it for granted so easily, but there are many permutations to what transportation needs are for people." 

Maine Cancer Foundation is currently funding several cancer patient transportation grants, including one at Lake Region Senior Service, Inc. Executive Director Dana Hanson believes in community-based transportation programs, which he says most effectively address gaps in Maine’s services. Mr. Hanson also notes that Maine has a significant senior population; their needs, including transportation, will only continue to grow in the years ahead.

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